• Celebrating AVID’s Success Through Research
    Third-party studies, evaluations, and published peer-reviewed research proves the effectiveness of AVID’s core beliefs.

  • AVID Schoolwide Impact

    • A Case Study on Increasing College Readiness through AVID (The BERC Study) [Read More]
    • Schoolwide Impact and AVID [Read More]
  • AVID Professional Learning Impacts

    • The AVID Effect – Professional Learning That “Sticks” and Engages Teachers [Read More]
    • Teacher Leadership [Read More]
    • Teacher Retention – Coming Soon
    • Teacher Attendance – Coming Soon
  • AVID Impact on Student Agency

    • Coming Soon
  • AVID in High School Settings

  • AVID in Middle School Settings

    • Evaluation of the AVID program in Albuquerque Public Schools [Read More]
    • Examining AVID’s Impact on Middle School Rigor and Student Preparedness [Read More]
  • AVID in Elementary School Settings

    • Coming Soon
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    A Case Study on Increasing College Readiness through AVID (The BERC Study)
    AVID Schoolwide Impact

    The College Readiness Initiative (CRI), sponsored by College Spark Washington (CSW), was launched in 2006 with six-year grants to 39 secondary schools serving low-income students in Washington State. Baker Evaluation Research and Consulting (BERC) conducted a longitudinal evaluation of the initiative, which included an impact assessment of the AVID program. Results indicated that students’ course-taking patterns and achievement improved, and subsequent high school graduation and college enrollment rates increased. The evaluation, found here, also provides the following key takeaways:

    • Skills and behaviors for academic success can be taught. Students can learn skills, behaviors, and techniques for academic success, especially when teachers have been trained and coached in effective instructional strategies to build a college-going culture.
    • A culture of positive academic peer pressure can be created. Building cultures of college and career readiness and confidence in the ability of all students to achieve their dreams creates momentum to transform individuals, classrooms, and communities.
    • Academic mindsets can be fostered. AVID has taught us that one of the best strategies for building academic mindsets is to create an environment of high expectations. As the program’s name suggests, personal achievement can be gained through hard work and determination.
    • Tutor processes and relationships are powerful. Whether one-to-one or in a small group setting, providing intensive support through tutorials boosts engagement and progress.
    • Strong student-teacher relationships make all the difference. The primacy of relationships shows up again and again in teaching and learning.

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    Schoolwide Impact and AVID
    AVID Schoolwide Impact

    An article published in the Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, by Watt, Powell, Mendiola, and Cossio (2006) examined high schools in Texas that used AVID as a model for comprehensive school reform. AVID schools in this study saw an improvement in areas of advanced course enrollment, students graduating with advanced graduation plans, AP/IB testing, and high school graduation or completion rates over the four-year period. Their districts also experienced gains in all four areas. Non-AVID schools experienced gains in students graduating on advanced graduation plans and AP/IB testing, and their districts followed the same pattern. However, results showed that the performance profiles of AVID schools and their districts have improved over four years of AVID implementation while the non-AVID comparison schools and districts did not show similar improvements even though their student demographics were very similar. Seven of the AVID schools and two of the non-AVID schools improved their accountability ratings. By impacting the performance of a cohort of predominantly non-white and/or low-income students, AVID can leverage the profile of the entire school even prior to having direct impacts on other non-AVID students schoolwide. Click here to read the full article.

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    The AVID Effect – Professional Learning That “Sticks” and Engages Teachers
    AVID Professional Learning Impacts

    This white paper illustrates how AVID professional learning (PL) exhibits characteristics of effectiveness, engages teachers, and fosters positive change in teacher behavior and student learning. AVID PL is an interactive, ongoing and supported process. It is based on instructional practices that are thoroughly researched and easily transferrable into school settings, making it relevant to both teachers’ and administrators’ respective learning environments. Pre- and post-survey results revealed the following:

    • Increases in the numbers of teachers who fully understand the AVID strategies
    • Increases in the numbers of teachers who fully integrated the AVID strategies into the way they teach in the classroom
    • Increases in the numbers of teachers who saw a positive change in the behavior of students and how students learned

    The findings in this study, found here, suggest that AVID PL exhibits multiple characteristics of effectiveness and correlates with increases in reported teacher and student engagement which result in more effective, dynamic learning experiences for students.

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    Teacher Leadership
    AVID Professional Learning Impacts

    The findings of a 2008 study published in Academic Leadership: The Online Journal conclude that AVID professional development, when defined as the number of AVID Summer Institutes attended, is a significant predictor of teacher leadership, even after any overlapping effects from a teacher’s gender, level of education, and teaching experience have been accounted for. Given the roles that teachers play in school improvement efforts, the implications of this study are important not only for those involved with AVID, but also for school and district administrators interested in school reform. Click here to read the full article. This study was replicated in later research and published in Professional Development in Education using more robust instruments. The findings indicated that even experienced teachers continue to develop as leaders after receiving additional types of professional development.

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    Virginia Beach City Public Schools
    AVID in High School Settings

    This comprehensive evaluation of AVID in VBCPS was designed to (1) examine the implementation and operation of AVID, and (2) determine the extent to which the program is meeting its goals and objectives. With regard to meeting goals and objectives, comparisons were made between an AVID group and either a matched comparison group, all non-AVID students in AVID schools, or all middle and/or high school students districtwide. Read a more detailed summary here, or click here to see the full evaluation.

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    Clark County School District
    AVID in High School Settings

    This evaluation of AVID in CCSD consisted of two distinct components: an outcome evaluation and an implementation evaluation. With regard to student outcomes, results from a matched sample of 474 10th, 11th, and 12th grade AVID students and 473 non-AVID students indicated that AVID students outperformed their peers in grade point average and Nevada High School Proficiency Exam (NHSPE) math test scores. AVID students also had higher pass rates than their peers on the NHSPE reading assessment, enrolled in more Honors/AP courses, and had higher attendance rates. Read a more detailed summary here, or click here to see the full evaluation.

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    Evaluation of the AVID program in Albuquerque Public Schools
    AVID in Middle School Settings

    This evaluation illustrates that when compared to a group of similar non-AVID students, students who enrolled in AVID while in middle school were much more likely to have taken 8th grade Algebra, have a significantly higher 8th grade GPA, and have significantly higher 9th grade attendance. The AVID students were also more likely than their non-AVID peers to be on track for future graduation as of the end of 9th grade. Read the full evaluation summary here.

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    Examining AVID’s Impact on Middle School Rigor and Student Preparedness
    AVID in Middle School Settings

    This mixed methods research study, published in American Secondary Education in 2013, examined the impact that AVID in middle school settings has on middle school course rigor and on students’ college readiness later in high school. When compared to students who only enrolled in AVID while in high school, students who enrolled in AVID in both middle school and high school had significantly higher GPAs, were more likely to complete four-year college entrance requirements, and were more likely to take an AP course. Read a more detailed summary here, or click here to see the full publication citation.

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