• An AVID Classroom in Action

    WHAT MAKES AN AVID CLASSROOM UNIQUE?

    There’s something unique about an AVID classroom. There’s more conversation, structured movement, and student-centered activity. These are just a few of the differences you can see in an AVID classroom. Here’s what AVID leaders use when observing a classroom.

  • AVID students engaged in a collaborative study group.

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PEER TUTORING

Students work together to master new content through inquiry-based tutoring. Students learn how to ask questions that go beyond memorization and encourage higher-level thinking. Peers ask each other questions that prompt deeper learning, and students know how to articulate their points of confusion.

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FOCUSED NOTE-TAKING

Students utilize the Cornell note-taking process to create powerful study tools. They are not just copying down words. Students learn to recognize the most important parts of a lesson, create questions to guide their studying, and revisit and refine their notes to solidify learning.

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COLLABORATION

Students demonstrate a strong sense of mutual respect and support, engaging in rigorous discourse and building on each other’s thoughts. Collaborative activities are structured and graded to promote participation from each student.

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EMBEDDED SOFT SKILLS

Students learn soft skills like public speaking, self-advocacy, time management, organization, and more. Here, a student is showing her presentation skills by confidently communicating with her group. There are a variety of AVID activities that allow students to hone their soft skills in an authentic way.

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CLASSROOM SET-UP

Desks and chairs are arranged to best suit the learning activity and to encourage students to talk and to work more effectively together.

  • AVID students involved in a Socratic Seminar activity.

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TEACHER FACILITATES LEARNING

AVID teachers design classroom activities that allow students to take ownership of the content. The teacher creates opportunities for students to investigate, talk, explore, and come to their own understanding.

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COLLEGE-READINESS ENVIRONMENT

College banners, posters, and pennants reinforce a college-going culture on campus. There’s an atmosphere of high expectations.

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INQUIRY-BASED ACTIVITIES

Students learn to ask critical questions to clarify their own thinking and the thinking of others.

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HIGHER-LEVEL THINKING

During activities like Socratic Seminar, students focus on content, build on each other’s thoughts, and challenge one another to think deeply. Students and teachers ask questions that don’t necessarily have a correct answer.

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READING AND WRITING TO LEARN

Students read a variety of texts utilizing AVID’s critical reading strategies and engage in metacognitive discussions of the texts along with reflective writing activities.